Human Flow

WHEN THERE IS NOWHERE TO GO, NOWHERE IS HOME. 

Nowhere Home (2012) and Fire at Sea (2016) are examples of how documentary filmmakers from different countries have tried to depict the refugee crisis that we’ve seen over the last years, but Chinese artist Ai Weiwei put together the most ambitious attempt yet. This film takes a look at refugee crises all over the world, from Syrians trying to reach Germany but getting stuck by the Macedonian border, North Africans trying to cross the Mediterranean, Palestinians spending decade after decade in Gaza’s camps, Pakistan sending Afghans back to their country, Mexicans trying to cross the U.S. border, etc. etc. Long and packed with depressing numbers about this awful world we’re sharing, but rewarding thanks to informative interviews and beautiful, rich camerawork from a team of cinematographers.

2017-Germany. 140 min. Color. Produced by Heino Deckart, Ai Weiwei, Chin-Chin Yap. Directed by Ai Weiwei. Screenplay: Chin-Chin Yap, Tim Finch, Boris Cheshirkov.

Last word: “You are on this beautiful beach and then you see a dinghy boat, peacefully approaching the port right in front of us. I turned on my iPhone camera and started filming. What I saw was shocking and unbelievable – a baby being handed out (of the dinghy), women climbing out. There was nobody there to receive them. I started to hear their stories. They had to walk 70 hours to reach the point where they can register. They sleep on the road. They are sitting in the rain. That made me so curious. They (the refugees) are proud people. They have dignity. They’re not beggars.” (Ai on how the project started, The Independent)

 

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