Tag Archives: Alfred Hitchcock

Lewis Gilbert 1920–2018

A hopelessly chopped up interview, but this is a talk with Lewis Gilbert, the director behind The Spy Who Loved Me (1977), Roger Moore’s finest effort as James Bond. It was also one of Gilbert’s best films. We lost him last week at the age of 97. Born in Hackney, London, Lewis Gilbert grew up behind … Continue reading Lewis Gilbert 1920–2018

My 12 Favorite Films

Compiling a list of what you believe are the greatest films ever made is a daunting task. Every critic and movie buff has a more or less available list hidden somewhere in their minds (or plainly written down, carefully cultivated). I have resisted to do the latter for many years, even though my list really … Continue reading My 12 Favorite Films

My 12 Favorite Horror Movies

Halloween is coming, and the dead shall rise from their graves. At least on a TV screen near you. We are awash in lists of the greatest horror movies ever made, and everybody’s trying to come up with a twist of their own. Well, I decided to just list my 12 favorites, a bunch of … Continue reading My 12 Favorite Horror Movies

The Man Who Knew Too Much

PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1 OF ALL THE WORLD… While vacationing in Switzerland, the Lawrences’ (Leslie Banks, Edna Best) witness a murder and receives information that should be valuable to the British… but then their daughter is kidnapped. A tightly directed and very enjoyable thriller that became a hit for Alfred Hitchcock, with a married couple … Continue reading The Man Who Knew Too Much

The 39 Steps: Another Man Knows Too Much

A HUNDRED STEPS AHEAD OF ANY PICTURE THIS YEAR! In 1934, Alfred Hitchcock had turned his first film for Gaumont British, a thriller called The Man Who Knew Too Much, into a hit. But his next endeavor for the studio and producer Michael Balcon would become his first truly great motion picture, an international hit … Continue reading The 39 Steps: Another Man Knows Too Much

San Francisco in Films and on TV

Every time I vacation in a major city I feel a need to buy a book that tries to capture either its soul or history. If I’m fortunate, the book does both. When I was in San Francisco last fall, I bought “A Crack in the Edge of the World” by Simon Winchester. I expected this … Continue reading San Francisco in Films and on TV

The Lady Vanishes: Terror on a Train

COMEDY! CHILLS! CHUCKLES! IN A MYSTERY EXPRESS! Alfred Hitchcock was contractually bound to do one more film for producer Edward Black, but he was out of ideas. That’s when Black suggested “The Lost Lady”, an adaptation of a novel by Ethel Lina White. The project had begun a year earlier with a crew journeying to … Continue reading The Lady Vanishes: Terror on a Train

The Trouble With Harry

A DIFFERENT KIND OF KICK-THE-BUCKET COMEDY! In the woods near Highwater, Vermont, several locals try to deal with the appearance of a dead man, among them Captain Albert Wiles (Edmund Gwenn), who believes that he must have shot him, and a young artist (John Forsythe). One of Alfred Hitchcock’s personal favorites, this supremely enjoyable black … Continue reading The Trouble With Harry

Notorious: Spy Games

THE SCREEN’S TOP ROMANTIC STARS IN A MELODRAMATIC MASTERPIECE! In the mid-40s, the legendary Hollywood producer David O. Selznick had plenty of opinions about the casting of Alfred Hitchcock’s upcoming thriller Notorious. He preferred Joseph Cotten over Cary Grant in the lead role, especially since he owned Cotten’s contract. In the end, he lost the … Continue reading Notorious: Spy Games