Tag Archives: Jessica Chastain

The Huntsman: Winter’s War

This continuation of Snow White and the Huntsman (2012) is both a prequel and a sequel, as we get to see how Eric (Chris Hemsworth) was raised into a fighter by Queen Ravenna’s (Charlize Theron) icy sister (Emily Blunt), only to fall out of favor. Later, after Ravenna’s demise, Eric becomes involved in a search … Continue reading The Huntsman: Winter’s War

A Most Violent Year

THE RESULT IS NEVER IN QUESTION, JUST THE PATH YOU TAKE TO GET THERE. In 1981, New York City businessman Abel Morales (Oscar Isaac) is trying to handle a new threat against his company – someone is organizing hijackings of his heating-oil trucks. A portrait of a world that isn’t necessarily criminal in nature, but … Continue reading A Most Violent Year

Crimson Peak

BEWARE. In the early 20th century, aspiring American author Edith Cushing (Mia Wasikowska), who writes in the tradition of Mary Shelley, is charmed by an English aristocrat (Tom Hiddleston); after a tragedy, he takes her to his crumbling mansion… Guillermo del Toro’s stab at a joyously old-fashioned horror movie will delight fans of classics like … Continue reading Crimson Peak

The Martian: Left Behind

BRING HIM HOME.  If you’ve ever been to Wadi Rum in Jordan, you’ve been to Mars. The valley has been Hollywood’s favorite location for movies set on the planet, its red sand and mountains being a perfectly convincing stand-in. That’s Wadi Rum you see in Mission to Mars (2000), Red Planet (2000) and The Last … Continue reading The Martian: Left Behind

Why the Oscars Need to Catch Up With the Golden Globes

It’s okay. Made my own! pic.twitter.com/kgyu1GRHGR — philip lord (@philiplord) January 15, 2015 Every year produces a barrage of hostile reactions to the Oscar nominees. And the history of the Oscars itself has numerous examples of outrages. Take the year of 1952, for instance, when Singing’ in the Rain, The Quiet Man and High Noon premiered, but The Greatest … Continue reading Why the Oscars Need to Catch Up With the Golden Globes

The Greatest Hits of 2015

It’s time for that annual list of next year’s highly anticipated Hollywood films. Here’s 2015 for ya. JANUARY: * Blackhat – Michael Mann’s first directorial outing since Public Enemies (2009) is a cyber thriller starring Chris Hemsworth. Its January release makes it hard to really get excited about it.  * Escobar: Paradise Lost – Notorious Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar reaches … Continue reading The Greatest Hits of 2015

Interstellar: Escape From Earth

MANKIND WAS BORN ON EARTH. IT WAS NEVER MEANT TO DIE HERE.  The day I saw this movie, I woke up feeling sad over what is a very common dream for me. It had taken me back to my teenage years, or childhood (time is not all that important in these dreams) and I was … Continue reading Interstellar: Escape From Earth

7 Great Horror Movies 2000–2014

Today is Halloween and I’m reminded of a blog entry I wrote two years ago celebrating a few clips from horror movies that I found particularly horrifying. It is interesting to note the effect that horror and comedy have on us. Most people would argue that it is perhaps a generational thing; you might not find what … Continue reading 7 Great Horror Movies 2000–2014

Take Shelter

When Curtis LaForche (Michael Shannon) starts having apocalyptic visions and disturbing nightmares, he decides to build a storm shelter in his backyard… but his family worries about his mental health. The director reunites with Shannon after Shotgun Stories (2007) for another independent film, but this time it is one that unites everyday life with the … Continue reading Take Shelter

The Debt

EVERY SECRET COMES WITH A PRICE.  In 1997, a few aging former Mossad agents are still revered by their countrymen for killing a WWII war criminal in the 1960s, but they share a less flattering secret… A remake of the 2007 Israeli movie Ha-Hov that hasn’t changed much of the original story. We follow the … Continue reading The Debt

The Help

CHANGE BEGINS WITH A WHISPER.    In early 1960s Mississippi, young “Skeeter” Phelan (Emma Stone) wants to be a writer and secretly starts interviewing black maids to find out what their lives are like in the segregated South. Tate Taylor was friends with author Kathryn Stockett, secured the rights to her novel and had a … Continue reading The Help