Tag Archives: Julianne Moore

The Forgotten

ON SEPTEMBER 24TH, EVERYTHING YOU’VE EXPERIENCED, EVERYTHING YOU’VE KNOWN, NEVER HAPPENED. 

Several months after Telly Paretta’s (Julianne Moore) son dies in a plane crash, she learns that everyone has forgotten him; every trace of him vanishes and it’s as if he never existed. Experienced viewers will believe that the boy did exist, but wonder how those who conned Telly got away with it. Once the explanation comes, we hardly expect the screenwriter to come up with a good resolution, because he can’t. It’s an inventive tale, but too contrived and the ending isn’t logical. The visual effects are good though, and so is Moore.

2004-U.S. 91 min. Color. Directed by Joseph Ruben. Cast: Julianne Moore (Telly Paretta), Dominic West (Ashley Correll), Gary Sinise (Jack Munce), Anthony Edwards, Alfre Woodard, Linus Roache.

Trivia: Nicole Kidman was allegedly considered for the part of Telly.

 

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Laws of Attraction

GETTING MARRIED IS A GREAT WAY TO FALL IN LOVE.

lawsofattarctionNew York divorce attorneys Daniel Rafferty and Audrey Woods (Pierce Brosnan, Julianne Moore) fight each other whenever they can, but end up getting married after an Irish night of drinking. Here’s a romantic comedy with nothing to rely on but its two charismatic stars. They’re fun to watch, Brosnan’s charm works very well in films like this, but they are saddled with a desperately conventional script that has few laughs. The visit to Ireland is welcome, but those environs don’t do enough for the movie; the same is true for the supporting actors.

2004-Britain-Ireland. 90 min. Color. Widescreen. Directed by Peter Howitt. Cast: Pierce Brosnan (Daniel Rafferty), Julianne Moore (Audrey Woods), Frances Fisher (Sara Miller), Parker Posey, Michael Sheen, Nora Dunn.

6 kopia

 

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The Hours: A Fight For Survival

THE TIME TO HIDE IS OVER. THE TIME TO REGRET IS GONE. THE TIME TO LIVE IS NOW.

 

thehoursWhen author Michael Cunningham finished work on his novel “The Hours”, he must have given himself a pat on the shoulder. His original intention was to make a contemporary update of Virginia Woolf’s classic “Mrs. Dalloway”, but he soon realized that there was a clever way to give his work more layers. Not only became “The Hours” a portrayal of a day in the life of a middle-aged editor in New York who resembles the title character, it also became a day in the life of a housewife in 1940s California who’s reading “Mrs. Dalloway”, as well as a day in the life of its author, Virginia Woolf. One day, three women, three crises. And it’s all a strangely uplifting experience.

Having read “Mrs. Dalloway” before reading “The Hours” or watching this film doesn’t hurt of course, but I can tell you from personal experience that it isn’t necessary. The film follows Clarissa Vaughan (Meryl Streep), the gay editor previously mentioned, as she is preparing to throw a party for her ex-lover (Ed Harris) who is dying of AIDS; Laura Brown (Julianne Moore), the housewife, as she spends a day on the run before celebrating her husband’s birthday that same evening; and Virginia Woolf as she is trying to recuperate from her mental illness by staying in the English countryside to write that famous novel. All these women should be reasonably happy – Laura and Virginia are married to kind, considerate men, Clarissa and Virginia are fortunate enough to be in a line of work they love, Laura and Clarissa are parents to wonderful children. But they’re not happy, they feel helpless and trapped, and the degree of despair on display here is the most fascinating thing about this movie. It all rings true; what if you’re living a life everyone would say is profoundly rich and you still can’t find satisfaction? What if your child means very little to you? Your marriage? Your work? Your friends? What if your only desire is to run away from it all? There is a sadness in this film that I think speaks to a lot of people, not only those who instantly know what these characters are going through.

A general sense of alienation
Homosexuality matters on more than one level. Some people believe this is the major theme of the novel and the film. It is admittedly a vital part of it that connects with the overriding theme, the general sense of alienation. The filmmakers are trying to make viewers understand what might be an occasional, or constant, feeling of being on the outside, not being able to take part in something that everyone else seems to be doing. But the story is also clearly optimistic in spite of the darkness; there are choices and there is always a tomorrow, no matter how trite those words of wisdom may sound. British director Stephen Daldry showed that it is possible to stay true to the literary original and still create a film that truly can stand on its own; he has great help from the screenwriter who knows how to spot the cinematic aspects of Cunningham’s work. The filmmakers portray the three settings in a meticulous way, but still manage to make the parts fuse seamlessly.

The three female stars are surrounded by a very impressive supporting cast, but they do nevertheless deliver the strongest performances in the film; Julianne Moore who gives the impression of being a prisoner in that perfect suburban life, Meryl Streep who actually seems to be improving with every year, and Nicole Kidman and her prosthetic nose who are both working so hard at doing Woolf justice. I know that Cunningham is very pleased with this film and he should be. He’s hoping for it to change someone’s life… and it just might.

The Hours 2002-U.S. 114 min. Color. Produced by Robert Fox, Scott Rudin. Directed by Stephen Daldry. Screenplay: David Hare. Novel: Michael Cunningham. Cinematography: Seamus McGarvey. Editing: Peter Boyle. Music: Philip Glass. Cast: Meryl Streep (Clarissa Vaughan), Nicole Kidman (Virginia Woolf), Julianne Moore (Laura Brown), Ed Harris, Toni Collette, Claire Danes… Jeff Daniels, John C. Reilly, Miranda Richardson.

Trivia: Eileen Atkins, who has a small part, adapted “Mrs. Dalloway” for the screen in 1998.

Oscar: Best Actress (Kidman). BAFTA: Best Actress, (Kidman), Film Music. Golden Globes: Best Motion Picture (Drama), Actress (Kidman). Berlin: Best Actress (Kidman, Streep, Moore).

Quote: “This is my right; it is the right of every human being. I choose not the suffocating anesthetic of the suburbs, but the violent jolt of the Capital, that is my choice. The meanest patient, yes, even the very lowest is allowed some say in the matter of her own prescription. Thereby she defines her humanity. I wish, for your sake, Leonard, I could be happy in this quietness. But if it is a choice between Richmond and death, I choose death.” (Kidman arguing with Stephen Dillane about where to recover after a suicide attempt)

Last word: “The difficulty was that we knew that the actresses would never meet because of their availability and because we were shooting wildly out of sequence. It was very much like mathematics – we had to be very careful about the architecture of the film before we started shooting it in terms of its cutting pattern. This was not a film created in the editing room, though a lot of decisions were made there, it was very much to do with the screenplay stage. We spent a lot of time testing and prepping everything so that when we came to shoot it we knew what we were doing.” (Daldry, The Guardian)

2 kopia

 

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Hannibal

BREAK THE SILENCE.

hannibal01Ten years after The Silence of the Lambs comes an opportunity to catch up with FBI agent Clarice Starling (Julianne Moore) and the runaway serial killer Hannibal Lecter (Anthony Hopkins), as she is going through a crisis and he is spotted by a daring cop in Florence. This time author Thomas Harris seemed to care more about spattering the scenery with blood than recreate the intelligent sensibilities that boosted the first movie. The story is a tad sluggish and the character of Hannibal has ended up another Freddy Krueger, but there are pleasing moments in all this bloody insanity…

2001-U.S. 132 min. Color. Produced by Dino de Laurentiis, Martha Schumacher, Ridley Scott. Directed by Ridley Scott. Screenplay: Steven Zaillian, David Mamet. Novel: Thomas Harris. Music: Hans Zimmer. Cast: Anthony Hopkins (Hannibal Lecter), Julianne Moore (Clarice Starling), Ray Liotta (Paul Krendler), Giancarlo Giannini, Gary Oldman, Frankie Faison.

Trivia: Followed by Red Dragon (2002).

Quote: “I must confess to you, I’m giving very serious thought… to eating your wife.” (Hopkins to Giannini)

6 kopia

 

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