Tag Archives: Max von Sydow

Michael Nyqvist 1960-2017

Swedish star Michael Nyqvist passed away yesterday at the age of 56. Only those who were close to him knew that he had cancer. International moviegoers will always remember him primarily as the investigative reporter Mikael Blomkvist in the Millennium franchise – and obviously as bad guys in Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol (2011) and John Wick (2014). … Continue reading Michael Nyqvist 1960-2017

Awakenings

THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A SIMPLE MIRACLE.  In 1969, physician Malcolm Sayer (Robin Williams) arrives at a Bronx hospital; after successfully using a different drug for catatonic patients, he sees them miraculously ”wake up”. This adaptation of Oliver Sacks’s experiences depicts the obvious anxiety and joy of coming back to life after being … Continue reading Awakenings

Ghostbusters II

BE READY TO BELIEVE US.  Five years after the events in the first film, the Ghostbusters have been forced out of business… but a new supernatural threat against New York City catches their attention. The charm from Ghostbusters (1984) is still intact in this sequel thanks to the wonderful cast, with Peter MacNicol adding fun … Continue reading Ghostbusters II

Wild Strawberries: Down Memory Lane

Going back to my original review of The Seventh Seal (1957), I was a little surprised at not even having mentioned Wild Strawberries. I described The Seventh Seal as a film that changed Sweden as a moviemaking country, and I still consider it one of the top ten greatest movies ever made. But it’s pretty … Continue reading Wild Strawberries: Down Memory Lane

Virgin Spring: Faith and Fury

Perhaps the most controversial of Ingmar Bergman’s films, The Virgin Spring was banned in Fort Worth, Texas because of its infamous rape scene, a decision that was later upheld by the Texas Supreme Court. The film was hotly debated among academics in Sweden as well, some of them questioning its artistic merits. At the time, … Continue reading Virgin Spring: Faith and Fury

Hannah and Her Sisters: Saved by the Marx Bros

There’s every reason for Mia Farrow not to enjoy watching this movie. Some of it was shot in her actual apartment, and she has talked about the creepy effect of sitting in one’s apartment flipping through channels and finding a movie that takes place exactly where you’re sitting. Then there’s also the fact that her … Continue reading Hannah and Her Sisters: Saved by the Marx Bros

Judge Dredd

ONE MAN IS JUDGE, JURY AND EXECUTIONER.  In the 2080s, most of mankind live in huge “Mega-Cities” where crime is rampant; Joseph Dredd (Sylvester Stallone) works as virtually a one-man army, serving as a cop, judge and executioner. The director’s first Hollywood movie disappointed fans of the original comic book. The action is well paced … Continue reading Judge Dredd

The Force Awakens: Saving Another Franchise

EVERY GENERATION HAS A STORY. There are some people out there who call themselves fans of Star Wars but still prefer to pretend like the trilogy of prequels that George Lucas created in 1999-2005 never happened, even though they were as excited about them before the premiere as they are now when the saga continues … Continue reading The Force Awakens: Saving Another Franchise

Best Intentions: Scenes From a Marriage

  Anyone familiar with Scandinavian cinema knows by taking a look at this sprawling cast that this is a special experience. Many of these first-rate actors have worked with the masterful Ingmar Bergman on stage or in movies and probably didn’t need much persuading to come aboard this project as long as it was faithful … Continue reading Best Intentions: Scenes From a Marriage

Conan the Barbarian

SLAVE. BARBARIAN. WARRIOR. THIEF. Sometime during the Hyborian Age, a slave boy grows up to become a man with a burning desire to avenge the brutal deaths of his parents at the hands of a wizard (James Earl Jones). Robert E. Howard’s pulp character gets a decent but uninvolving screen treatment, even if the film … Continue reading Conan the Barbarian

Miss Julie: A Midsummer Nightmare

  In 1888, when August Strindberg offered a Stockholm publisher his new play “Miss Julie”, he added a warning: “I ask you not to refuse it too easily because you may regret it”. He was refused nevertheless, likely due to the play’s frank dialogue. In the end, Strindberg did agree to a few changes made … Continue reading Miss Julie: A Midsummer Nightmare