Tag Archives: Sam Waterston

Hannah and Her Sisters: Saved by the Marx Bros

There’s every reason for Mia Farrow not to enjoy watching this movie. Some of it was shot in her actual apartment, and she has talked about the creepy effect of sitting in one’s apartment flipping through channels and finding a movie that takes place exactly where you’re sitting. Then there’s also the fact that her … Continue reading Hannah and Her Sisters: Saved by the Marx Bros

The Newsroom

Aaron Sorkin’s return to television was touted as a classic network drama made for cable, taking us behind the scenes of ACN, a fictional cable news network, where a legendary anchor (Jeff Daniels) was getting bored with the current predictable state of the media and politics; the arrival of an ex-girlfriend (Emily Mortimer) as ACN’s … Continue reading The Newsroom

Lincoln in Movies: Serene, Forgiving and Freaky

The death of President Abraham Lincoln in 1865 was naturally a great shock to a nation that had just survived a war that tore it apart. That, as well as a 19th century kind of sentimentality, is probably what inspired some artist in 1865 to produce the image above where George Washington greets Lincoln in … Continue reading Lincoln in Movies: Serene, Forgiving and Freaky

Heaven’s Gate

THE ONLY THING GREATER THAN THEIR PASSION FOR AMERICA… WAS THEIR PASSION FOR EACH OTHER. Director Michael Cimino’s legendary follow-up to The Deer Hunter (1978) ruined his reputation and became such a commercial failure that it almost destroyed a movie studio – but the criticism hasn’t always been fair. This depiction of the 1890s Johnson County War … Continue reading Heaven’s Gate

The Great Gatsby

GONE IS THE ROMANCE THAT WAS SO DIVINE. In 1922, Nick (Sam Waterston) rents a small house next to two Long Island mansions; getting to know both owners he finds out about a secret romance that refuses to die. The most famous screen adaptation of “the great American novel” can hardly be labeled a “great American … Continue reading The Great Gatsby

Interiors

As a well-to-do family in New York falls apart, its members get ample opportunities to vent their anxieties and feelings of insufficiency. In Love and Death (1975) Woody Allen made jokes about Ingmar Bergman movies. With this film, his first one hundred percent joke-free effort, he has essentially done something that could have come from Bergman. The relationships … Continue reading Interiors